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TMAG commemorates 1967 Tasmanian bushfires

AN exhibition that commemorates the 50th anniversary of one of the state’s most catastrophic natural disasters has opened in Hobart.

Presented by the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG), “One Hell of an Inferno: The 1967 Tasmanian Bushfires” tells the story of the fires that engulfed south-eastern Tasmania on 7 February, how they occurred, their impact on people, communities and the environment, and why they could happen again.

The exhibition opened on 15 December 2016 and will be on show until 19 March 2017.

TMAG director Janet Carding said the exhibition provided opportunities for Tasmanians who lived through the “Black Tuesday” tragedy to share their personal stories and experiences.

“The exhibition is very important to TMAG as it represents a genuine collaboration within the Tasmanian community to create a focal point for people to come together to remember and learn about this major event that occurred 50-years-ago,” she said.

Ms Carding said TMAG worked with the community to borrow photos, film footage and objects collected at the time.

“We have also included several of the oral histories recorded in the Tasmania Fire Service (TFS) video story booth that has been travelling around the state for the past year,” she said.

As part of the 1967 Tasmanian Bushfires commemorations, TMAG held a Community Bushfire Day on 5 February, which explored the role fire plays in the state’s landscape and lifestyle.

The museum marked the 50th anniversary of the fires with a special ceremony on 7 February.

The exhibition received funding support from the Tasmanian Community Fund.

TMAG is open daily from 10am until 4pm. Admission to the exhibition is free.

Caption: Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery curator Ian Terry and guests viewing the exhibition. Photo credit: Karen Brown Photography.

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