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Driven to help in your community

ON any given day throughout the state, many Tasmanians are able to get to appointments with the generous support of volunteers in the local community.

For those who aren’t in the know, CTST – Community Transport Services Tasmania – provides transport to eligible Tasmanians over the age of 65 or who have a disability.

The service is funded by the State and Federal Government to assist eligible consumers to remain in their homes for as long as possible.

Recently, the organisation has seen unprecedented growth, with the service now providing transport to more than 7000 Tasmanians annually.

Last financial year, the organisation’s fleet of more than 80 vehicles travelled nearly 3.5 million kilometres and delivered around 150,000 trips throughout the state.

CTST has vehicles running almost every day of the year with services across most of the state including a service on Flinders Island.

CTST chief executive officer Lyndon Stevenson said the past 12 months had been a record for CTST, with a growth of around 40 per cent.

“We know there are more people we can help within the community and we are on the lookout for new volunteers to help meet this demand,” he said.

“We are fortunate here in Tasmania to have so many community-minded people and it’s no surprise that 98 per cent of our volunteers engage because they want to help people in their own community.”

CTST driver John Rundle said he had now been volunteering with CTST for a few years.

“I have to say, it’s a very rewarding experience,” he said.

“I’ve met some really interesting people and it’s just great to know that I’m making a difference.”

If you are looking to find a way to give back in your community then CTST is a great way to do it.

As a driver you are provided with a shirt, cap and full induction before heading out on the road to make a difference in the community.

If you would like to become a volunteer driver, phone 1800 781 033.

Caption: Community Transport Services Tasmania volunteer driver John Rundle. Photo credit: Bob Catchpole.