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Escape to the mountain and Hobart’s Great Short Walk

ONE of Hobart’s oldest and scenic bushwalks has been returned to its former glory following a two-year, $2 million project to restore two mountainside tracks.

The Great Short Walk restoration project was launched by Lord Mayor Anna Reynolds and Her Excellency Professor the Honourable Kate Warner, AC, Governor of Tasmania on 10 April at The Chalet.

Hobart’s Great Short Walk is one of Tasmania’s 60 Great Short Walks and comprises the Pinnacle and Organ Pipes tracks on Kunanyi/Mount Wellington.

“The project is the City’s largest ever investment in the mountain and took two years to complete,” Lord Mayor Reynolds said.

“It has breathed new life into two of the mountain’s most remarkable walking tracks and opened up the area directly beneath the Organ Pipes to people of all walking abilities.”

Both tracks had suffered degradation since they were first built early last century.

Over the years, boulders have obliterated sections of the tracks and water has caused severe erosion making the tracks hard to access for some walkers.

To restore the tracks, 1,100 helicopter airlifts were carried out to deliver 900 tonnes of rock and gravel to the mountain side.

In addition, 65 hazardous rocks – some weighing as much as 10 tonnes – were stabilised to prevent rockfall.

“Our track builders have done an incredible job bringing these tracks back to their former glory and creating new pathways through mountain boulder fields,” Lord Mayor Reynolds said.

“Our landscape architects and heritage officers made sure the heritage values were respected by applying the same track building techniques that were used to create the original tracks.

“I encourage everyone in Hobart to go and experience the Great Short Walk and immerse themselves in the history and spirit of our mountain.”

For more information, visit hobartcity.com.au/greatshortwalk.

Caption: Experience the Great Short Walk and immerse yourself in the history and spirit of our mountain. Photo credit: Pete Harmsen.