A garden for respite and recovery

A SPECIAL garden has been created at the Repatriation Centre to be used for occupational therapy.

The Peacock Garden was completed with the assistance of a $36,000 funding grant from the Tasmanian Community Fund and $3,300 from the Claremont Ladies Auxiliary.

Occupational therapy manager Christy Dorward believes the space would be beneficial to the rehabilitation of clients.

“Gardening is a popular Australian past time,” she said.

“Many people that occupational therapists work with have identified gardening as an activity that they enjoy and wish to return to as part of their recovery.

“A garden also provides a beautiful, peaceful and natural setting to meet family and friends and as a place to reflect and think.

“The hospital clients who have spent time in the garden value the chance to get out into the fresh air and sunshine and away from feeling like a ‘patient’ for a short time.

“As summer approaches, we look forward to an expansion of activities in this space.”

Clients and local artists have also contributed to the creation of the garden.

“The name was chosen by Volunteer Services from a short list created in a ‘Name the Garden’ competition with clients, family and staff on the wards,” Ms Doward said.

“We acknowledge the beautiful mosaic signs created by artist Jacqui Dawborn.

“We value the gift of the grass tree that pays tribute to a valued member of our social work team who has since passed, and recognise and acknowledge the Mouheneenner people, the traditional owners of the land on which we can garden, recover, socialise and reflect.”

The Peacock Garden is available for clients, families and staff from the Peacock Unit, Acute Rehabilitation Unit, Community Rehabilitation Unit, Orthotics and Prosthetics and the Whittle Ward.

Caption: The Peacock Garden is now offering respite and recovery services to patients at the Repatriation Centre.